overground scene


In hindsight: great albums omitted 2010-2014

Since 2010 I have been writing a post at the end of each year accounting for each year’s music offerings. However, as it happens given financial, time-related and other constraints, many great albums often go unnoticed in time for each year’s recount. In this post I will mention some brilliant albums that deserved to be on the five lists that I compiled over the last five years, but were not. Before I get on with this task I will also mention some albums that I heard over the years and, although I would not include them in the best-of list I still enjoyed them a lot.

I consider Foo Fighters to be a very unreliable band. They have released an album that I consider to be a flawless masterpiece (One to one) and then a bunch of albums that I cannot listen to. Their 2012 album, Wasting Light, is an awesome album full of awesome tunes which at times flirt with grunge, at others with garage rock and hard rock. A song like “Dear Rosemary” could have easily been written by Nicke Andersson. Moving on, although not a fan of melodic technical death metal, Gorod‘s A perfect absolution (2012) is a pretty cool album. Fans of the genre will definitely appreciate some excellent riffs and structures that borrow a lot from post-Whisper Supremacy Cryptopsy and post-Goremageddon Aborted, Necrophagist, as well as Atheist, the forefathers of technical death metal. “Sailing into the earth” has some super inventive riffs. The more clean and shouted vocals still make me cringe, but overall this is a good album. Weapons to Hunt is the continuation of Infinited Hate, the band fronted by Aad from Sinister and the former guitarist of Sinister, a death metal genius, Ron. The album they released in 2012 titled Blessed in sin, is an old school death metal monolith, a bit more thrashier than both Sinister and Infinited Hate. Although I think it suffers production-wise (I cannot stand the sound of the drums), it is a great death metal album full of insane riffs that embody the trademark genius of Ron. Dark Tranquility‘s Construct (2013) is another album I eventually liked, but didn’t blow me away. Henriksson’s limited involvement in songwriting is quite apparent, as there is an almost complete lack of fast songs (with the exception of segments on the brilliant “Science of noise” and “Apathetic”). Nevertheless, DT is lucky to have several great songwriters and the result is a very emotional and dark album with some great tunes.

I will now move on to some albums that are marked by pure excellence, but, for various reasons, were left out of each year’s best-of lists:

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailjpg1. Danzig – Deth red sabaoth (2010)

Danzig’s Deth red sabaoth is quite a treat of an album. Although I have been a huge Misfits and Samhain fan for many years I never really got into Danzig’s solo band.  I liked his first album, although I have not listened to it for many years. Many of his other albums sounded boring to me back in the day, but if this album is even slightly representative of them I think I should revisit them. Darkness and heaviness are two things that are not stranger to Danzig, and this album is full of both. At times it reminds of Black Sabbath and Type O Negative, but a much deadlier and sicker version of both. Time has definitely taken its toll on Danzig’s voice, but his songwriting ability is still sublime. I like all of the songs on it, but particularly “Rebel spirits“, “On a wicked night“, “Deth red moon“, and “Left hand rise above“.

enfr2. Enforcer – Diamonds (2010)

Enforcer is probably the leading heavy/power metal band in Sweden’s expanding old-school heavy metal movement. Diamonds, their second album, is a pure masterpiece that I listened only recently and completely blew me away. While their debut album and their third one are closer to the Germanic interpretation of British heavy metal, reminiscent of the faster moments of Accept, Avenger, and early Rage, as well as US power metal, Diamonds is much more pure British heavy metal. On songs like the unbelievable “Katana“, “High roler” and “Diamonds”, the NWOBHM praise is crystal clear. From time to time other influences find their way into their beautiful musicality, such as early Queensryche (on “Running in menace”). On the faster songs the influence of other British bands, like Satan, is also apparent. Everything is perfect about this album; awesome, riffs, awesome choruses, awesome solos, and perfect playing ability by all band-members. An absolute masterpiece.

majes3. Immolation – Majesty and Decay (2010)

When this album came out in 2010 I was slightly disappointed, which is the reason why it was not included in that year’s best-of list. In hindsight, it should have definitely been included. At the time I felt that this album was quite stagnant and did not introduce anything new in the Immolation legacy. The introduction, as well as the fact that it had an instrumental piece near the end pissed me off because I always considered Immolation a no-bullshit kind of band, and I thought that all this filler crap were just gimmicks of lesser bands. I still always skip the intro and the instrumental piece. I also had an issue with the awful drum sound which unfortunately persisted in Immolation’s next album. Immolation always had this swampy and under-produced sound, which I think was very special and integral to their identity. Going from that to the fake triggered sound of this album was disappointing. However, the song-writing is excellent as always. Songs like “A glorious epoch“, “A token of malice“, “Divine code” and “The rapture of ghosts” are up there with the best songs in their career.

morbus-chron-sleepers-in-the-rift-cover4. Morbus Chron – Sleepers in the rift (2011)

The first Morbus Chron album is a masterpiece of Swedish death metal that stands proudly next to giants of the genre, like Entombed and Dismember. Having said that, the references one immediately gets are not necessarily Swedish death metal bands but those bands that Dismember and Entombed drew on back in the day, such as Autopsy and Death. Indeed, there are riffs directly lift off Autopsy’s first couple of albums. However, the manner in which these influences are woven in MC’s style is almost magical. The tempos are a bit more spasmodic and intense than any old Swedish death metal band, with the exception maybe of Afflicted. Robert’s singing is fascinating, he is a truly brilliant performer. I listened to this masterpiece a year after its release and it took me at least another year to find the vinyl version, which includes the brilliant “Obscuritas“, one of the most excellent songs of Swedish death metal.

AMON-Liar-in-Wait5. Amon – Liar in wait (2012)

I properly listened to Liar in wait a year after it was released and my initial contact with it was an awkward one. The song that opens the album is one that still I don’t consider representative of the rest of the songs, in fact I consider it to be the worst on the album. The rest of the songs are monuments of furious old school death metal, where one hyper-brutal riff follows the other without giving the listener any room to breathe. In one word, this album is relentless. The prevalent tempo is the blast-beat, with a few short slower passages and a few slayer-beat sections. The singer has some genuinely brutal vocals and the capacity to sing really fast, albeit the style is quite monotonous. The winning point of this record is definitely the purely astounding riffs. In many cases there is a certain quality to the riffs that is reminiscent of classical music and I often envision them being played by an orchestra. Some bring into mind Deicide‘s Legion, such as the opening riff of “Lash thy tongue and vomit lies” and the second riff of “Semblance of man”. The excellently harmonised manic riffs on “Eye of the infinite” and the riffmageddon on “Semblance of man” and the ABSOLUTELY MIND-BLOWING “Sentience and sapience” are jaw-dropping. The vinyl version comes with a great cover-art and a lyrics inner sleeve. I really hope they will release another album, ’cause this one is a masterpiece.

zt6. Tragedy – Darker days ahead (2012)

Tragedy’s latest album was a bit hard to digest and I have to admit that when it first came out it confused me. Having released three masterpieces of fast brutal hardcore – whereby the D-beat constituted the backbone of almost every melancholic and depressing melody which contributed to the establishment of their unique identity – the considerable slowing down of pace came as a surprise. In hindsight, this album is not that different. Anyone interested in Tragedy will instantly identify Tragedy’s distinctive attitude. It is not even that more miserable than the earlier albums. The main difference is the abandonment of the D-beat. I still find it a bit difficult to listen to, but every time I do I get chills down my spine. “Darker days ahead“, “Power fades” and “To earth like dust” must be some of the best songs ever written.

black7. Black Trip – Goin’ under (2013)

I listened to Black Trip at the end of 2014 and I couldn’t believe my ears. Heavy metal hasn’t been so awesome in decades. Black Trip is the brainchild of Peter Stjarnvind, a brilliant musician who has left his mark on pillars of Swedish metal, such as Entombed (Peter’s contributions among others include the awesome “What you need” and “Night for day“) and Merciless (Peter’s contributions include “Violent obsession” and “Fallen angels universe“). While Black Trip obviously stand on the shoulders of giants, they do so in an inspiring way. The songs of this album are reminiscent of early Iron Maiden (e.g. “No tomorrow“, “The bells”), Saxon and Thin Lizzy (e.g. “Goin Under“, “Radar“), Kiss (e.g. “Putting out the fire“), and Mercyful Fate (e.g. “Tvar Dabla“). The way these songs are being put together, however, is magical. Joseph Tholl is a genius singer/lyricist, Peter’s soulful solos are perfectly complemented by Sebastian’s furious leads, and all the energy is craftily captured and engineered by the competent hands of Fred Estby and Dolf De Borst in Gutterview studios, the new Mecca of Swedish hard rock and heavy metal. (*Some of the lyrics on the song “The bells” are taken from Edgar Allan Poe’s poem of the same name)

3803938. Imperial State Electric – Reptile brain music (2013)

The reason I did not listen to ISE’s latest album when it first came out is that I could not find the vinyl version, so I had to wait until the early 2014. Music-wise, I guess this album picks up where the previous one left off. Nicke has written some of his best tunes so far, like the contagious “More than enough of your love“, the bluesy “Faustian bargains“, the furious “Born again“, which brings into mind another tune Nicke wrote years ago, “I wanna touch” (Hellacopters). “Nothing like you said it would be” draws heavily on Kiss’s first album. One of the exciting things about this album is Nicke’s collaboration with Fred Estby in putting together the song “Dead things”, a dark and heavy song whose atmosphere is reminiscent of their previous collaboration in Necronaut on the song “The tower of death“. It is obviously a fascinating album, yet I can’t help but compare it to the previous two albums which, in my ears are much better. The main thing I disliked about this album is the lyrics, which, compared to the previous two albums, seem a bit rushed.

pentagram19. Pentagram Chile – The malefice (2013)

Pentagram is a band that has been mentioned as an influence by several bands that I worship, such as Napalm Death, Dismember and Entombed. I was also aware that Anton, who replaced Jesse in Lock Up, was Pentagram’s guitarist. That made me look them up a few years ago and I found a video of their awesome demos on YouTube. This album is officially their first ever and has new songs that could have been written in the late 1980s. The style is very similar to Anton’s main band, Criminal, although Pentagram is much less groovy. If anything, this album is extremely addictive, the way albums used to be in the past; full of catchy riffs, choruses and clever yet approachable arrangements. In that sense, what Pentagram do on this album is a lost art. While the vocals and lots of the arrangements are very brutal, the thrash elements are also strong on Pentagram’s sound. “The apparition“, a song that is meant to become a classic, is reminiscent of early Slayer on songs like “At dawn they sleep“. The German thrash influence can be seen on several songs, especially in “Arachnoid”, whose main riff sounds a lot like Kreator‘s “Terrible certainty“. In some ways lots of riffs on this album, like the riff that opens the album, sound a lot to me like Cannibal Corpse. Tomas Lindberg’s vocal contribution on “Sacrophobia” is pretty cool, while I thought that Schmier’s contribution on “Spontaneous combustion” was a hit and miss.

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